Jacobus Aloysius Adrianus van Tiggelen, 19472007 (aged 59 years)

Name
Jacobus Aloysius Adrianus /van Tiggelen/
Nickname
Jacques
Birth November 30, 1947 42 35
Death of a maternal grandfatherJacobus Gerardus Johannes Doggen
November 27, 1949 (aged 1 year)
Shared note: Register velden

Register velden Archief 910 Register 4216 Overlijdensregister 1946-1950 Akte velden Aktenummer 100 Persoons velden Rol overledene Voornaam Jacobus Gerardus Johannes Achternaam Doggen Plaats geboorte Halsteren Plaats overlijden Steenbergen Datum overlijden 27-11-1949 Woonplaats Steenbergen Leeftijd 67 jaar Rol relatie Voornaam Wilhelmina Cornelia Achternaam Dekkers Rol vader Voornaam Mathijs Achternaam Doggen Rol moeder Voornaam Wilhelmina Achternaam Willemen

Van grafsteen overgenomen.

www.markiezenhof.nl Jacobus Gerardus Johannes Doggen 27-11-1949 Aktenummer 100, Pagina 118 van 149 Aktenummer 100 Aktedatum 28-11-1949 Overledene Jacobus Gerardus Johannes Doggen, 67 jaar Partner Wilhelmina Cornelia Dekkers Vader overledene Mathijs Doggen (overleden) Moeder overledene Wilhelmina Willemen (overleden) Overlijdensdatum 27-11-1949, drie uur (03:00) Overlijdensplaats Steenbergen Geboorteplaats Halsteren Getuigen Petrus Adrianus Doggen , 31 jaar, landbouwer, Steenbergen

Burial of a maternal grandfatherJacobus Gerardus Johannes Doggen
November 30, 1949 (aged 2 years)
Death of a fatherJohannes Adrianus van Tiggelen
December 16, 1960 (aged 13 years)
Shared note: Archief 910

Archief 910 Register 10002 Overlijdensregister 1956-1960 Akte velden Aktenummer 81 Persoons velden Rol overledene Voornaam Johannes Adrianus Achternaam Tiggelen Tussenvoegsel van Plaats geboorte Wouw Plaats overlijden Steenbergen Datum overlijden 16-12-1960 Woonplaats Steenbergen Beroep landbouwer Leeftijd 55 jaar Rol relatie Voornaam Adriana Wilhelmina Achternaam Doggen Rol vader Voornaam Cornelis Achternaam Tiggelen Tussenvoegsel van Rol moeder Voornaam Adriana Cornelia Achternaam Daverveldt

http://www.de-vierschaer-wouw.nl/img/Database%20bidprentjes%20Wouw.pdf: Tiggelen, Johannes Adrianus van Wouw 1905 05 02 Steenbergen 1960 12 16 Doggen, Adriana Wilhelmina

Ook uit bevolkingsregister (www.markiezenhof.nl).

Burial of a fatherJohannes Adrianus van Tiggelen
December 21, 1960 (aged 13 years)
Death of a maternal grandmotherWilhelmina Cornelia Dekkers
July 5, 1971 (aged 23 years)
Burial of a maternal grandmotherWilhelmina Cornelia Dekkers
July 9, 1971 (aged 23 years)
Death of a motherAdriana Wilhelmina Doggen
June 5, 1977 (aged 29 years)
Burial of a motherAdriana Wilhelmina Doggen
June 9, 1977 (aged 29 years)
Death of a brotherCornelis Jacobus Maria van Tiggelen
November 16, 1993 (aged 45 years)

www.familysearch.org Name: Cees J.M Van Tiggelen Event Type: Burial Event Date: 1993 Event Place: Meeniyan, , Victoria, Australia Photograph Included: Y Birth Date: 26 Jun 1941 Death Date: 16 Nov 1993 Affiliate Record Identifier: 95041590 Cemetery: Meeniyan Cemetery

Begraafdatum uit: Krantenbank Zeeland de Stem | 1993 | 23 november 1993 | pagina 14

Burial of a brotherCornelis Jacobus Maria van Tiggelen
November 19, 1993 (aged 45 years)
Death June 9, 2007 (aged 59 years)

Woonde te Lignac, Frankrijk.

www.tiggelen.net 9 juni 2007 (Leeftijd 59) Lignac

http://www.frenchentree.com/france-indre-real-lives/displayarticle.asp?id=18175 From the Low Countries to Lignac Is the heyday of farming over for the Indre? Dutchman Jacques van Tiggelen had great expectations for the potential of farming in the Indre when he moved from Belgium 6 years ago. “I had already farmed in Holland,” he says, “and I had been to France many times, as I used to export my Texel sheep to the Indre.”

Jacques with his dogs

Land was cheap then and with excellent pasture for his flock there was the prospect of making good money, so he and his partner bought a 40-hectare farm near Les Herolles on the Indre/Vienne borders. He found the local people very friendly, but his partner came from a town area and found the French countryside too lonely, so she returned home. Jacques hoped his son would come out here, but he has decided to stay in Belgium, leaving Jacques to farm on his own.

Having renovated the house, Jacques wanted some more land for his growing flock of sheep, and he was offered a farm of 100 hectares to rent at a small hamlet near Lignac in the Indre.

The farmhouse near Lignac

Jacques now has a flock of 600 sheep at the farm; 400 Texel lambs and 200 Ouessant sheep. The Texel originated on the Isle of Texel off the coast of the Netherlands early in the nineteenth century. This breed is known for its remarkable muscle deve lopment and leanness and has become the sheep most used for breeding in Europe.

Ouessant sheep in the Indre

Ouessant sheep, one of the smallest in Europe, are a very useful breed as they are able to adapt to any soil or climatic conditions. They come from the Isle of Ouessant off Brittany, and were saved from extinction by chateau owners who wanted them as lawn mowers! Their light hooves don't damage the grass like the larger breeds. “They are really hardy and can stay out all winter,” says Jacques. “Ewes have plenty of milk and lamb growth rates are above average.”

The carcases are noted for their exceptional meat to bone ratio, and are tastier than Texel, as Jacques explains. As they are not very large they are a better size to feed a small family. His lambs finish between 15 – 17 kg dead weight, 8 – 10 kilo s when prepared. Jacques sells direct to consumers such as restaurants or families who want to buy for the freezer, and the animals go to the local slaughterhouse in Argenton-sur-Creuse.

As well as sheep, Jacques also has a few pigs and Jersey cows. The pigs root around on the site of an old chateau in the fields near the house. They are Duroc and Pietrain breeds which Jacques is keeping for himself, as a hobby. The Jersey cows als o give plentiful milk.

The rented farm is in the Brenne Natural Park, an area of outstanding beauty with over a thousand lakes, and a haven for wildlife. The grass is lush and green, but drainage can be a problem on farms here, and not all of the land can be utilised. An d world markets are changing. Although farmland is still cheap, the arrival in France of the big supermarkets, now in almost every town and village, means that small farmers get very little for their livestock.

As Jacques explains, “French Texel lambs retail at up to 17 euros per kilo, but farmers receive only 5 euros per kilo. Then there’s the competition from other countries - New Zealand lamb sells in the supermarket at only 3 euros per kilo.”

He goes on “Feed for stock has become much more expensive, and it’s not possible to make a living in farming now without subsidies or a second job. Some farmers I know have turned to truck driving a few days a week to make ends meet.” “ Some farmers have turned to truck driving to make ends meet ”

He thinks the French are spending less money on fresh food now and are starting to eat fast food. The emphasis in the supermarkets is on keeping prices down; French vegetables are now more expensive than imports from countries such as Morocco and A lgeria although the quality of these imports is often inferior.

So what of the future of the 100-hectare farm? The owners have put it up for sale; the enormous barns are no longer used to their full capacity and the house has fallen into disrepair. All over the area the land is going back to nature, suitable on ly for hunting. Sadly, it seems the heyday of farming in France - and the Indre - is over.

Rural reality in the Indre

Jacques says, “If the farm were bought by British people it could be turned into gites accommodation or large holiday complex, but it would need a big investment.” Next year Jacques comes up to retirement age and he will probably give up the sheep on the rented farm. Will a young family buy the farm and start to revive the traditions of French farming in the Indre? Or will the silence of the lambs prevail?

Family with parents
father
mother
Ad_Doggen
19121977
Birth: July 16, 1912 29 24Halsteren
Death: June 5, 1977Roosendaal en Nispen
elder brother
Graf_CJM_v_Tiggelen
19411993
Birth: June 26, 1941 36 28Steenbergen
Death: November 16, 1993Melbourne, Australië
sister
Private
sister
Private
himself
Jacques_van_Tiggelen_with_his_dogs
19472007
Birth: November 30, 1947 42 35Steenbergen
Death: June 9, 2007Lignac, Frankrijk
brother
Private
Family with Private
himself
Jacques_van_Tiggelen_with_his_dogs
19472007
Birth: November 30, 1947 42 35Steenbergen
Death: June 9, 2007Lignac, Frankrijk
ex-wife
Private
son
Private
daughter
Private
DeathView

Woonde te Lignac, Frankrijk.

www.tiggelen.net 9 juni 2007 (Leeftijd 59) Lignac

http://www.frenchentree.com/france-indre-real-lives/displayarticle.asp?id=18175 From the Low Countries to Lignac Is the heyday of farming over for the Indre? Dutchman Jacques van Tiggelen had great expectations for the potential of farming in the Indre when he moved from Belgium 6 years ago. “I had already farmed in Holland,” he says, “and I had been to France many times, as I used to export my Texel sheep to the Indre.”

Jacques with his dogs

Land was cheap then and with excellent pasture for his flock there was the prospect of making good money, so he and his partner bought a 40-hectare farm near Les Herolles on the Indre/Vienne borders. He found the local people very friendly, but his partner came from a town area and found the French countryside too lonely, so she returned home. Jacques hoped his son would come out here, but he has decided to stay in Belgium, leaving Jacques to farm on his own.

Having renovated the house, Jacques wanted some more land for his growing flock of sheep, and he was offered a farm of 100 hectares to rent at a small hamlet near Lignac in the Indre.

The farmhouse near Lignac

Jacques now has a flock of 600 sheep at the farm; 400 Texel lambs and 200 Ouessant sheep. The Texel originated on the Isle of Texel off the coast of the Netherlands early in the nineteenth century. This breed is known for its remarkable muscle deve lopment and leanness and has become the sheep most used for breeding in Europe.

Ouessant sheep in the Indre

Ouessant sheep, one of the smallest in Europe, are a very useful breed as they are able to adapt to any soil or climatic conditions. They come from the Isle of Ouessant off Brittany, and were saved from extinction by chateau owners who wanted them as lawn mowers! Their light hooves don't damage the grass like the larger breeds. “They are really hardy and can stay out all winter,” says Jacques. “Ewes have plenty of milk and lamb growth rates are above average.”

The carcases are noted for their exceptional meat to bone ratio, and are tastier than Texel, as Jacques explains. As they are not very large they are a better size to feed a small family. His lambs finish between 15 – 17 kg dead weight, 8 – 10 kilo s when prepared. Jacques sells direct to consumers such as restaurants or families who want to buy for the freezer, and the animals go to the local slaughterhouse in Argenton-sur-Creuse.

As well as sheep, Jacques also has a few pigs and Jersey cows. The pigs root around on the site of an old chateau in the fields near the house. They are Duroc and Pietrain breeds which Jacques is keeping for himself, as a hobby. The Jersey cows als o give plentiful milk.

The rented farm is in the Brenne Natural Park, an area of outstanding beauty with over a thousand lakes, and a haven for wildlife. The grass is lush and green, but drainage can be a problem on farms here, and not all of the land can be utilised. An d world markets are changing. Although farmland is still cheap, the arrival in France of the big supermarkets, now in almost every town and village, means that small farmers get very little for their livestock.

As Jacques explains, “French Texel lambs retail at up to 17 euros per kilo, but farmers receive only 5 euros per kilo. Then there’s the competition from other countries - New Zealand lamb sells in the supermarket at only 3 euros per kilo.”

He goes on “Feed for stock has become much more expensive, and it’s not possible to make a living in farming now without subsidies or a second job. Some farmers I know have turned to truck driving a few days a week to make ends meet.” “ Some farmers have turned to truck driving to make ends meet ”

He thinks the French are spending less money on fresh food now and are starting to eat fast food. The emphasis in the supermarkets is on keeping prices down; French vegetables are now more expensive than imports from countries such as Morocco and A lgeria although the quality of these imports is often inferior.

So what of the future of the 100-hectare farm? The owners have put it up for sale; the enormous barns are no longer used to their full capacity and the house has fallen into disrepair. All over the area the land is going back to nature, suitable on ly for hunting. Sadly, it seems the heyday of farming in France - and the Indre - is over.

Rural reality in the Indre

Jacques says, “If the farm were bought by British people it could be turned into gites accommodation or large holiday complex, but it would need a big investment.” Next year Jacques comes up to retirement age and he will probably give up the sheep on the rented farm. Will a young family buy the farm and start to revive the traditions of French farming in the Indre? Or will the silence of the lambs prevail?